Oscar Wilde

Oscar Wilde

Oscar Fingal O'Flahertie Wills Wilde (1854–1900) was an Irish writer, poet, and prominent aesthete. His parents were successful Dublin intellectuals, and from an early age he was tutored at home, where he showed his intelligence, becoming fluent in French and German. He attended boarding school for six years, then matriculated to university at seventeen years old. Reading Greats, Wilde proved himself to be an outstanding classicist, first at Dublin, then at Oxford. After university, Wilde moved around trying his hand at various literary activities: he published a book of poems and toured America lecturing extensively on aestheticism. He then returned to London, where he worked prolifically as a journalist for four years. Known for his biting wit, flamboyant dress, and glittering conversation, Wilde was one of the most well-known personalities of his day. He next produced a series of dialogues and essays that developed his ideas about the supremacy of art. However, it was his only novel, The Picture of Dorian Gray – still widely read – that brought him more lasting recognition. He became one of the most successful playwrights of the late Victorian era in London with a series of social satires which continue to be performed, especially his masterpiece The Importance of Being Earnest.

At the height of his fame and success, Wilde suffered a dramatic downfall in a


Edited: Seregil of Rhiminee April 29, 2010
Book Covers
The Happy Prince and Other Tales
The Picture of Dorian Gray7.86
Lord Arthur Savile's Crime and Other Stories
A House of Pomegranates
Complete Fairy Tales of Oscar Wilde

Speculative Fiction Novels (5)


1990 | fantasy, short stories

1892 | fantasy, short stories

1891 | horror

1891 | horror, mainstream, short stories

1888 | fantasy, short stories