The Adamantine Palace (The Memory of Flames, #1)
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The Adamantine Palace

by Stephen Deas
Release date: March 16, 2009
Type: speculative fiction
Genres: fantasyhigh fantasy

David Gemmell Morningstar Award nominee 2009.

There will be flames

The power of the Realms depends on its dragons. Jealously guarded, nurtured by their handlers, ridden by the aristocracy, they are bred for hunting and for war. But only the alchemists and the mysterious liquid they administer to the dragons stand between the Realms and disaster; for without the liquid, the dragons would return to their natural fury: Unbiddable, terrifying, awesomely strong, able to destroy an entire army and to burn a kingdom to ashes.

Prince Jehal is thinking of other things. Of power over all the Kings and Queens of the Realms; and he is prepared to charm, lie, betray, plot, and murder to get it. Nor is he alone in his ambition. Queen Shezira has her daughters and she means to use them as she herself was used, to gain the ultimate prize, marrying them off to secure her influence and power.

All sell-sword Kemir is thinking of is money. Of freedom from the un-ending arrogance of the dragon riders. And maybe of a little cold revenge against the warlords who both need him and despise him.
    
And now a dragon has gone missing…

Stephen Deas' debut novel is a gripping tale of Machiavellian politics, of court intrigue, of lust and betrayal. And dragons. Awe-inspiring, horrifyingly powerful, fire-breathing nightmares that have forgotten what freedom tastes like. Until now...

"A fast, sharp, ruthless read" – Joe Abercrombie

(updated 2017-01-16)

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Reviews (1)

Seregil of Rhiminee avatar
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4.0
Stephen Deas' debut fantasy book, The Adamantine Palace, was a good and enjoyable book. I enjoyed reading this book, because the plot was interesting and complex enough to keep me interested in it. The story moved fast forward, which was nice. Although I liked this book, it wasn't a perfect book because it had some flaws. The worst flaw was that there was no map of the world in the hardcover edition (epic fantasy books should always contain a map of the world). I also found the characters to ... (more)
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